Research

Research

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Publications

How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics

(University of Chicago Press, forthcoming August 2020).

The rise of the Tea Party redefined both the Republican Party and how we think about intraparty conflict. What initially appeared to be an anti-Obama protest movement of fiscal conservatives matured into a faction that sought to increase its influence in the Republican Party by any means necessary. Tea Partiers captured the party’s organizational machinery and used it to replace established politicians with Tea Party–style Republicans, eventually laying the groundwork for the nomination and election of a candidate like Donald Trump.

In How the Tea Party Captured the GOP, Rachel Marie Blum approaches the Tea Party from the angle of party politics, explaining the Tea Party’s insurgent strategies as those of a party faction. Click here for more.

Trump-ing Foreign Affairs: Status Threat and Foreign Policy Preferences on the Right.

Rachel Blum and Christopher Parker. Perspectives on Politics 17, no. 3 (September 2019): 737-755. (Replication files) Click here for more.

“Student-Run Exit Polls 101.”

Croco, Sarah E., Elizabeth Suhay, Rachel Blum, Lilliana Mason, Hans Noel, Jonathan Ladd, and Michael A. Bailey. PS: Political Science & Politics 52, no. 2 (2019): 361–66. doi:10.1017/S1049096518002330. Click here for more.

Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach

Solomon Messing, Patrick Van Kessel, Adam Hughes, Nick Judd, and Rachel M.Blum,

“Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach,” a Pew Research Center Report

(February 2017). Click here for more. 

Is there such a thing as a Conservative Foreign Policy?

Rachel M. Blum and Christopher S. Parker, “Is there such a thing as a Conservative

Foreign Policy?” in the Brookings Governance Series (October 2014).

Click here for more. 

A Tangled Web: Religion and the Regime in the US

Rachel M. Blum and Clyde Wilcox, “A Tangled Web: Religion and the Regime in the

US,” in Religion and Regimes: Support, Separation, and Opposition, eds.Ted Jelen and

Tehran Tamadonfar (Lexington: Lexington Books, 2013).

Click here for more. 

Publications

How the Tea Party Captured the GOP: Insurgent Factions in American Politics

(University of Chicago Press, forthcoming August 2020).

The rise of the Tea Party redefined both the Republican Party and how we think about intraparty conflict. What initially appeared to be an anti-Obama protest movement of fiscal conservatives matured into a faction that sought to increase its influence in the Republican Party by any means necessary. Tea Partiers captured the party’s organizational machinery and used it to replace established politicians with Tea Party–style Republicans, eventually laying the groundwork for the nomination and election of a candidate like Donald Trump.

In How the Tea Party Captured the GOP, Rachel Marie Blum approaches the Tea Party from the angle of party politics, explaining the Tea Party’s insurgent strategies as those of a party faction. Click here for more.

Trump-ing Foreign Affairs: Status Threat and Foreign Policy Preferences on the Right.

Rachel Blum and Christopher Parker. Perspectives on Politics 17, no. 3 (September 2019): 737-755. (Replication files) Click here for more.

“Student-Run Exit Polls 101.”

Croco, Sarah E., Elizabeth Suhay, Rachel Blum, Lilliana Mason, Hans Noel, Jonathan Ladd, and Michael A. Bailey. PS: Political Science & Politics 52, no. 2 (2019): 361–66. doi:10.1017/S1049096518002330. Click here for more.

Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach

Solomon Messing, Patrick Van Kessel, Adam Hughes, Nick Judd, and Rachel M.Blum,

“Partisan Conflict and Congressional Outreach,” a Pew Research Center Report

(February 2017). Click here for more. 

Is there such a thing as a Conservative Foreign Policy?

Rachel M. Blum and Christopher S. Parker, “Is there such a thing as a Conservative

Foreign Policy?” in the Brookings Governance Series (October 2014).

Click here for more. 

A Tangled Web: Religion and the Regime in the US

Rachel M. Blum and Clyde Wilcox, “A Tangled Web: Religion and the Regime in the

US,” in Religion and Regimes: Support, Separation, and Opposition, eds.Ted Jelen and

Tehran Tamadonfar (Lexington: Lexington Books, 2013).

Click here for more. 

Panel Study Of The MAGA Movement

Panel Study Of The MAGA Movement

The Panel Study of the MAGA Movement (PSMM) is a survey designed to assess the attitudes and behavior of the people who consider themselves part of the “Make America Great Again” movement, popularized by the Trump campaign in 2016.

© Copyright 2021 · Dr. Rachel Blum, PhD by Align Digital Consulting

© Copyright 2021 · Dr. Rachel Blum, PhD by Align Digital Consulting